Latest Releases

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LESSONS & LOVERS

April 24, 2020

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CRYIN' SHAME SINGLE

2019

 
 

In the Press

GRACE & GRIT INTRODUCES LATEST RELEASE BY WONKY TONK

March 6, 2020

Grace & Grit Announces it will release "Lessons & Lovers" by Wonky Tonk & the HighLife on all major digital platforms on April 24, 2020

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Discography

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LESSONS & LOVERS

Wonky Tonk & the HighLife

https://www.citybeat.com/music/spill-it/blog/21091173/engaging-greater-cincinnati-singersongwriter-wonky-tonk-returns-with-new-lessons-music-video


Engaging Greater Cincinnati singer/songwriter Wonky Tonk is gearing up for the release of her anticipated new full-length album, Lessons & Lovers, which is due later this year and is the follow-up to her 2015 debut LP, Stuff We Leave Behind.

In advance of the release of the album — credited to Wonky Tonk & The High Life, which features bassist Eric Dietrich and drummer Alessandro Corona — comes the music video for “Lessons,” the penultimate track on Lessons & Lovers.

Like a lot of Wonky Tonk’s material, “Lessons” borrows some tools and tricks from Folk and Country music playbooks and toolkits. But the music is never limited by those facets, boasting a clever experimental slant that gives it its distinctive charm and often an Indie Rock edge. Think Jenny Lewis by way of Modest Mouse.

Wonky Tonk's music exists entirely in its own universe, though, sounding exactly like exactly no one else.

“Lessons” begins with just guitar and vocals, but as it creeps along, sounds swirl in the background subtly, creating a haunting ambiance. The song builds, sonically and emotionally — Tonk’s voice grows increasingly confident, moving from reflection and melancholy to full-on strength and empowerment, escalating to a refrain of “I’ve got all the love that I need.” In the video description, “Lessons” is described as “a song about self-love, the healing power of love and the light choosing Love brings to even the most mundane.”

Along with her music, Wonky Tonk has a history of great, artistic music videos. “Lessons” sees her reteamed with director Dave Morrison, who helmed her clip for “Four Letter Word,” the 2017 Cincinnati Entertainment Award winner for Best Music Video.

Visit wonkytonkmusic.com for upcoming shows, album details and the latest Wonky Tonk info.

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CRYIN' SHAME

Wonky Tonk

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LOVE DETOX

Wonky Tonk

https://www.toddstarphotography.com/blog/2017/2/news-wonky-tonk-releases-love-detox-7-inch


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, FEBRUARY 20TH, 2017; Covington KY based singer/songwriter Wonky Tonk has released her brand new 7 inch record "Love Detox" via Leesta Vall Sound Recordings.


"Love Detox was an idea that came together in pieces. 'Peter Pan from Brooklyn,' originally called 'Weird' was recorded 4 years ago and originally intended for the full length "Stuff We Leave Behind" but never made the cut. 'Four letter word' was written in one night, recorded the next day but had no place to go and couldn't stand as a single. While extremely different in feel and style these songs fit together so so well on a true 'a' and 'b' side; the light and dark side of the moon. The two together came at a time following a break up and visit to a Chicago Tarot card reader and thus marked an era I called "Love Detox;" a time to let go, clean up and rediscover self love, the magic of the world and the kindness of strangers." - Jasmine Poole AKA Wonky Tonk

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SUITORS

Wonky Tonk

https://indiebandguru.com/wonky-tonk-suitors/


The emergence of modern folk rock has also brought about the reemergence of profound, culturally-conscious lyrics. The honesty of musicians like Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash, who dealt with important and sensitive topics with satirical, dry mock-nonchalance, is making a comeback.

This return of the genre has also brought about the popularity of women singers dealing with issues felt deeply and personally by women. Riding this wave is Jasmine Poole (aka Wonky Tonk) who just released her snarky new single “Suitors.”

Wonky Tonk Releases Sweet but Hard Hitting Single

Hailing from Kentucky, Poole no doubt knows firsthand the underlying hardships faced by many women. Self-dubbed a “punk cowgirl,” Poole deals with issues of double standards and sexism in a sarcastic, playful way. Her style results in lyrics that are more thought provoking than any punk rock song ever could be.

“Suitors” begins with a simple acoustic guitar intro. The majority of the song is fairly straightforward, but it’s the mellow folk rock aspect of the track that hearkens back to the deep-rooted beginnings of the genre. There’s some subtle country influences in the track, and some definite Dolly Parton influences. The almost happy-go-lucky tune makes the lyrics that much more heavy.

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BULLEIT

Wonky Tonk

We are going a bit country for a Friday Fire Track premiere today from Wonky Tonk so grab your finest bourbon, a chair and some headphones. Jasmine Lorraine “Wonky Tonk” Poole grew up in Kentucky so her love for folk and bluegrass is completely understood but she mixes roots with her own wave of indie rock on her debut, Stuff We Leave Behind, which is why you will want to pay attention.

Today’s track leaves the modern at the door as “Bulleit” comes at you with the directness of Loretta Lynn and Wanda Jackson while still being fresh like Nikki Lane. You get the story and the strings as Lorraine sings “and I’ll drink to the morning; and I’ll sing through the night.” This track won’t sell you on her indie spirit but if like one ounce of her swagger here I guarantee that Stuff We Leave Behind will have you wanting more especially if Jenny Lewis or Kelly Hogan is something that is in one of your playlists.

https://thefirenote.com/2015/12/11/premiere-friday-fire-track-wonky-tonk-bulleit/

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STUFF WE LEAVE BEHIND

Wonky Tonk & the Holiday Ramblers

https://cincymusic.com/blog/2015/09/wonky-tonk-stuff-we-leave-behind


Wonky Tonk is Jasmine Poole. She has been playing for about 7 years now. She has seemingly blended country and folk into a raucous good time, and a time to make you think. Her debut album is titled Stuff We Leave Behind. The players that she enlisted to be on the album is a who’s who of Cincinnati local talent whom are: Rachel Rose, Amy Cluxton, Laura Linville, Abby Hine, Brian Olive, Royal Holland, Eric Cronstein, Andy Cook, Ricky Nye, Frontier Folk Nebraska, Mike Ingram, Mark Utley, Jeff Meeker, Sharon Udoh, and as Jasmine put it “maybe a whole other village of people.” What shines through is Jasmine’s voice, and you can hear it in the songs this was the culmination and now it is time to leave it behind. Jasmine and I had a conversation about the record and few other things and I’ll let her take it from here and give my opinion of the record at the end.

Moose: How did you get your start playing music?
Wonky Tonk: I started playing tunes in high school with a punk rock band called "The Green Angels" with Alex Duckworth (Daap Girls) and Jude MC.  At the same time, I wrote some funny tunes for a high school chemistry project which somehow developed from living room Against Me! and Moldy Peaches jams into cowgirl boots and the stage.

Green Angels > Wonky Donkeys > Wonky Tonk

I took "guitar lessons" from this guy rick who had an impressive bald/long red mullet which consisted of a bunch of music theory played on an unplugged red electric ESP (classy). I still have no idea what he was saying.

Moose: whom has been your biggest advocate or supporter or both?
WT: Biggest supported: Law Daddy. The King of Covington. Matthew Robinson. My dad. I have had a world of support but there is something about Wonky Tonk that makes my dad glow and that in turn makes Wonky Tonk grow (ha-ha, see what I did there?!)

Moose: What drew your ear to this style of music?
WT: I have no clue. I love punk and mosh pits. I started playing and people said "you play folk." I was like what the heck is that, so I googled "folk" and started listening and well, the rest is in the songs.

Moose: Not delving into each song in particular, but from where could you say you got most of your inspiration for the album?
WT: The album is about all the things that meant the world to me at one point which are no longer pertinent and now have become stuff that is taking up too much space and needs to be left behind. You know when you go through your keepsake box and there is a napkin with a note scribbled or a nondescript show wristband and you are like, I have absolutely no idea what this is - but when you put it in there it was this thing that meant everything, a milestone. It is now stuff. Let it go.

Moose: Who played on the record with you, and where was it recorded?
WT: Are you asking this to torture me?

Holy moley.

Rachel Rose, Amy Cluxton, Laura Linville, Abby Hine, Brian Olive, Royal Holland, Eric Cronstien, Andy Cook, Ricky Nye, Frontier Folk Nebraska, Mike Ingram, Mark Utley, Jeff Meeker, Sharon Udoh - and maybe a whole other village of people. It was not me who made this record, it was us - Cincinnati's amazing community of talented and gracious musicians. It was recorded in Mike Ingram's living room, Eric Cronstein's Tone Shoppe, Orangudio in Columbus, and Brain Olive's The Diamonds.

Moose: With the album complete what is next for you? And why did it take so long? (this second question is mainly for me)
WT: The album is finished, now that it is finished everything can begin. Relentless tour and more albums! I am working on a new music video for "Denmark" with Dave Morrison as well as a new single from the upcoming album. Why did it take so long? Wonky Tonk started, well, I have no idea why it started. I decided I needed a new hobby so I started emailing all the Cincy venues saying I had a 30-minute set and would like to play. At that point I had no song written. When I got my first booking, was when I wrote my entire set and from there it grew. Somehow people liked it and I was propositioned to record. This was never a reality in my world, the music was kind of a joke too. So with multiple sessions of 6 years I learned to record. Finally. It took so long because until now I had been faking it and I couldn't release a fake because it is forever. It took 6 years to understand what my heart already knew and now it is real and now it is left behind.

Moose: The question I like to ask everyone I interview is: of all things to do, why this? why music? You can do anything; why did you choose music?
WT: The music chose me Moose. It's the way all things good and bad fall out and become something more than "stuff." Music means pain. community. love. loss. suspension. connection. It's what happens when I stop trying and just be.

Wonky Tonk released this album a month or two ago, and she along with all the players and the help made a really great record. Her voice longs for love, but is okay with leaving all this behind and going forward. The feeling from the album I get is one that makes you want to move on and the struggle that lies beneath that. Jasmine’s voice draws you in the way in which the lyrics wrap around the melody is what she does so well. Cannot leave this alone without mentioning all the players on it who took simple songs (voice and acoustic guitar) and helped mold and shape these tunes into something more. The album rocks at times and slows things down with some ballads a mixture that is like a tasty salad with all kinds of goodness. You listen one time through and you get the idea, but that second or third or fourth time different sounds pop or lyrics ring or touch you a little harder.

Wonky Tonk and her brand of folk music will be on a stage near you some time soon. Check her out on Facebook and stay up to date on her live shows. If you see her out, make sure to pick up the album. Wonky Tonk‘s Stuff We Leave Behind is an album worth listening definitely more than once and is an album that has soul.  Support local music and check her out.

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SUPER HOLY FANTASTIC EP

Wonky Tonk & The Hula Hooping Bandits

Grace & Grit is constantly signing new artists in a variety of genres. From up and coming musicians to veteran artists, Grace & Grit loves producing and mixing tracks that audiences will love, and Sam Robertson is a great example of that. Get in touch to discover more about the work they’ve done with Sam Robertson.

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GET ON THE TRAIN

Wonky Tonk

Grace & Grit loves working on different types of musical projects with their different artists. No matter their preferred genre, Grace & Grit believes in educating their artists in different types of styles. Chris Rush is just one of the examples of exceptional artists who are able to transition between styles without missing a beat. Check out their latest work and learn what makes them so amazing.

 

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